Books of January

The Great Gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald

I, of course, had to start off the twenties reading the perhaps most famous book set in that time period (20ies). Because, as I learned, during my winter break I have become predictable. 

I found the green light to be confusing. Not the metaphor, but the actual green light. I don’t think that they had green light bulbs in the twenties, so how did they achieve a light like that? The only thing I can think of, is having oxidized copper in the lamp screen but that seems a bit too complicated. Also, who names a place where rich people live, West and East Egg? Gatsby was an agreeable character, his optimism was inspiring although it at times was more delusional than admirable. It’s interesting how a book about a lonely and sad man gets turned into an excuse to party. Side note, the latest movie adaptation has a serious lack of jazz-music.             

The Kingdom of Copper

S.A Chakraborty

I went and bought it right after finishing The City of Brass, Review Here . I waited a couple of weeks before reading it, in order to not get the books mixed up. I did not expect the five year time jump, but it certainly made sense. I find Ali’s new powers rather confusing, but so does all of the characters, hopefully answers will be provided in the next book. This book tackles segregation and racism in an admirable way. But what I enjoy most, is the ongoing debate on whether to let past misdeeds affect future beneficial deeds. It is after all a rather important topic, should you prevent something good from happening just because the site was used for evil in the past? In addition to Chakraborty taking on morality, I immensely enjoy her take on magic, her worldbuilding is intricate and believable. Chakraborty is a master of cliffhangers, among many other things, which is very frustrating. I want the next book now! Sadly I will have to wait a few months.           

Stay with me

Ayọbámi Adébáyọ

Partly due to not wanting to remain predictable, I read this book. The other part was because my mother’s book club was reading it and I wanted to join them in a discussion. Despite my initial reservations (that it was a book for older women) I found that I liked it. It was far out of my comfort zone and I found little in the story to relate to. At times I found the main character embarrassing, because the things that she did in order to try and get pregnant was to much for me, had I ever been interested in having children, then perhaps I wouldn’t have felt like that. The interesting thing, is that there were actually two main characters, although I’m unsure if they got an equal amount of page time. Anyhow, I truly felt like this was the woman’s book, and that her husband was just there to move her story forward. He was too me, something I had to put up with while reading. Still, Adébáyọ wrote in such a way that I just had to continue reading, it takes a lot of skills to make something unfamiliar captivating. While I still do not feel able to relate to any of the themes in the story, I feel like I left the book with a greater understanding of other people than before beginning, and isn’t that the point of reading?          

Turning darkness into light  

Marie Brennan 

This is the stand-alone sequel to the wonderful series “The memories of lady Trent” which combined two of my favourite subjects, natural science and dragons. Brennan’s book series makes me want to be a 19-century scholar who makes marvelous scientific discoveries and helps shatter the glass ceiling while finding my academic soulmate. Since time travel is impossible I will instead settle for becoming a scientist with an immense interest in history. A scientist for a partner would also be nice. In “Turning darkness into light” we no longer follow lady Trent and her natural science, instead we follow her granddaughter Audrey, who is an archeologist, also one of my favourite subjects. The book is just as awesome as it’s predecessors. But instead of just tackling sexism, this book also criticizes xenophobia, something that’s always good to criticise. I hope that this sequel is also turned into a series, I truly adore Brennan’s writing.

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